Mongolia Adopts Daylight Saving Time (Again)

Just when I thought I had gotten to a country where I wouldn’t have to deal with changing all the clocks twice a year, the Mongolian government decided just a few weeks ago to adopt daylight saving time (DST).

So, a simplified history of DST in Mongolia:

First they didn’t have it.

Then they did (1960, and changing the time frame in 1985).

Then they didn’t (1999).

Then they did (2001).

Then they didn’t (2005).

Now they do.

At least some people are already on top of things and have changed the map on Wikipedia that shows which countries observe DST (blue), formerly observed DST (orange), and never observed DST (red):

Mongolia would be the big blue patch in the sea of orange that is the rest of Asia ("DaylightSaving-World-Subdivisions" by Paul Eggert - based on Image:BlankMap-World-Subdivisions.PNG, plus the data in the tz database, plus data in the maps on the INMS's Time Zones & Daylight Saving Time page.. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:DaylightSaving-World-Subdivisions.png#/media/File:DaylightSaving-World-Subdivisions.png)

Mongolia would be the big blue patch in the sea of orange that is the rest of Asia (“DaylightSaving-World-Subdivisions” by Paul Eggert – based on Image:BlankMap-World-Subdivisions.PNG, plus the data in the tz database, plus data in the maps on the INMS’s Time Zones & Daylight Saving Time page.. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:DaylightSaving-World-Subdivisions.png#/media/File:DaylightSaving-World-Subdivisions.png)

To complicate things, a huge number of people weren’t even aware that the government had decided to begin DST again, so many people didn’t change their clocks. After all, they don’t have the luxury(?) of being used to changing them twice a year. The time change was officially at 2am on Saturday, March 28, but those who weren’t aware of it (read: the vast majority of the parents of our students at the Bookbridge center) showed up an hour late to whatever they had going on. I knew many people would either forget or weren’t aware at all about the time change, so I posted in the Facebook group we made for our adult beginner’s English class to remind them so that they wouldn’t be late for the class I taught yesterday, but we don’t have a way to contact all the middle and high school students who come to our Bookbridge English classes. But hopefully everyone will be on the same page by Monday so I’m not the only one showing up to work on time.

And of course Mongolia’s DST doesn’t correspond with America’s, making it even more difficult to keep track of how many hours ahead I am of my family back home. When I first came to Mongolia, it was DST in America, and I was 12 hours ahead of my family on the east coast. But then when DST ended, I was 13 hours ahead. Then of course daylight saving started again in the US earlier in March. Back to 12 hours. And now daylight saving has started up in Mongolia, bringing it back to 13 hours. And of course DST ends at different times in each country as well (September in Mongolia, November in the US), so I get to deal with it even more in fall!

Maybe I’ll just bookmark this handy little web page that lets me know the official time here in the UB time zone and when the DST changes are for the next few years (unless, of course, the government decides to ditch it again).

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One thought on “Mongolia Adopts Daylight Saving Time (Again)

  1. Pingback: Spring Has Sprung! | Min in Mongolia

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